This full day event took place on 9th October, 2019 in Westminster Central Hall.

Presentations and recordings from the event are available below.

The Agenda is here.

Recordings & Presentations from the Summit

 

  • Tom Farr: Behind the curtain of the porn industry; a look at the corporate giants profiting from sexual exploitation. Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  • Dr. Kathleen Richardson: Sex Robots and the Hatred of Women and Girls. Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  •  Pat Branigan: Harmful Sexual Behaviour: Its prevalence and links to other types of abuse and trauma.Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  • Julie Bindel & Fiona Broadfoot: Press for Change: Helping journalists understand the reality of the global sex trade.Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  • Dr. Sam Carr, Bath University: Internet pornography and the erosion of empathy.Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  • Mary Sharpe, The Reward Foundation: The Challenges of Teaching School Pupils about Internet Pornography.Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  • Maureen O’Hara: Recognising the Links between the Sexual Exploitation of Children and Women: How can we End Demand for Both? Click here for the slides. Click here for the recording.

  • Sarah Champion: Supporting women to exit sexual exploitation. Click here for the recording.

  • Laila Namdarkhan How small activism can bring results: how a central London Porn Fest got cancelled.Click here for the recording.

About

The CEASE Summit 2019 is an event intended to unite diverse groups and individuals committed to ending sexual exploitation in all of its forms, including pornography, sex trafficking, prostitution, child sexual exploitation and other forms of sexual violence and abuse. We’ll expose the links between these different forms and explore how to tackle drivers such as objectification, hyper-sexualisation and the commercial sex industry.

Unified by a common aim, the Summit is a forum for mutual support and encouragement, a time for sharing news, developments and ideas, and for nurturing collaboration. Join us as we hear from a leading voices in this important area, including politicians, academics, journalists, activists and charity workers.

  • Discover more about the interconnectedness of different forms of sexual exploitation
  • Gain unique and diverse perspectives on how to address the drivers and underlying causes of abuse
  • Get updates on the latest news, initiatives and developments

Visit the Event Page for CEASE 2018

Speakers

Sarah Champion

Sarah Champion

MP for Rotherham and Shadow Secretary of State for Women and Equalities (2016–2017)

Julie Bindel

Julie Bindel

Journalist, author and political activist

Sammy Woodhouse

Sammy Woodhouse

Survivor, whistle-blower and activist

Sam Carr

Sam Carr

Senior Lecturer, Bath University

Mary Sharp

Mary Sharp

CEO of the Reward Foundation

Fiona Broadfoot

Fiona Broadfoot

Survivor and activist

Kathleen Richardson

Kathleen Richardson

Professor of Ethics and Culture of Robots and AI, DeMontford University

Pragna Patel

Pragna Patel

Director, Southall Black Sisters

Pat Branigan

Pat Branigan

Development & Impact Manager at the NSPCC

Maureen O'Hara

Maureen O'Hara

Senior Lecturer in Law, Solicitor, Coventry University

Tom Farr

Tom Farr

Human rights researcher, Law student

Caroline Hattersley

Caroline Hattersley

Director, women@thewell

Laila Namdarkhan

Laila Namdarkhan

Object

Helena Croft

Helena Croft

Founding Trustee and Executive Director of Streetlight UK.

Carole Stone CBE

Carole Stone CBE

Fiona Bruce, MP

“Prostitution and the commercial sex industry are intrinsically linked with modern slavery. As we have heard, the market for commercial sex operates as a pull for traffickers and organised crime groups.”

Report by UN Commission on Human Rights Special Rapporteur on Trafficking in Persons, Sigma Huda

“It is rare that one finds a case in which the path to prostitution … [does] not involve, at the very least, an abuse of power and or an abuse of vulnerability. Power and vulnerability in this context must be understood to include power disparities based on gender, race, ethnicity, and poverty.”

Catharine Mackinnon

“…when fear and despair produce acquiescence and acquiescence is taken to mean consent, consent is not a meaningful concept.”